I am an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Political Science (by courtesy) at the University of Michigan. I use big data, machine learning and text analysis to study conflict, radicalization and violent extremism.

My current research examines the behavior of Islamic State supporters on social media. Specifically, I study how supporters respond to experiences of anti-Muslim hostility in the West (invited to revise and resubmit at the American Political Science Review), how they react to online propaganda, and whether they are sensitive to counter-extremism programs aiming to reduce radicalization. These projects draw on new data on the online behavior of over a million users linked to the Islamic State on Twitter, which I will soon make available for other researchers to use.

My other projects examine the effect of war on pro-social behavior (published in the Journal of Economic Perspectives), the impact of terrorism on the dissemination of right-wing ideology in popular media (forthcoming in International Organization), the way in which symbolic and material attachment to land can shape the resolution of territorial disputes (conditionally accepted at Political Science Research and Methods), and the link between security threats and citizens’ attitudes towards immigration.

I hold M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D.  in Political Science from Columbia University and a B.A., summa cum laude, in Politics with Highest Honors from New York University.